Course Offerings

Spring 2018 Course Listing

University Catalog

HMS, POLS, ES 110-10  Environmental Planning for Healthy Cities (SS) 4 credits 14269  
Professor Beck-Pooley T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. 

HMS, ENGL 115-10  Vital Signs: Medicine and Popular Culture (HU) 4 credits  13578  
Does popular culture have a “fever” for medical narratives? If so, does it merely represent or actually influence how biomedicine is thought of and practiced in everyday life? What makes contagious disease fit so well within the genre of science fiction, or makes surgery and psychiatry so conducive to horror? How does pharmaceutical advertising play upon anxieties and desires of general or specific populations in Western culture?  In this class, we will draw from several disciplines to think about medicine as both a biological reality and social construction so that we may understand medicine’s “cultural work” in the context of history, sociology, and literary, film, and cultural studies. We will consider the role of different genres (drama, science fiction, horror, and reality TV, to name a few) and media forms (fiction, news, social media, video games, film, and television). Topics will include doctor-patient relationships, mental illness, contagious disease, medical education, pharmaceuticals, enhancement, and bioethics. To these ends, our objective is to explore how biomedicine produces and is a product of our culture. Students will learn how to think and write critically about medicine as a science/technology, system of thought, and social force.
Professor Servitje T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. 

HMS, STS, HIST 118-10  History of Modern Medicine (HU) 4 credits 12140  
Professor Smith M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 

HMS, SOAN 120-10  Values and Ethics of Community-Engaged Research (SS) CBE Diversity  4 credits 14098 
Professor Stanlick M; 7:10 - 10:00 p.m

HMS, PSYC 138-10  Abnormal Psychology (SS) 4 credits 13531   
Professor Lomauro M, W; 7:10 - 8:25 p.m.

HMS 170-10  Medical Humanities (HU)  4 credits 14316  
Professor Servitje T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 

HMS 180-10  Introduction to Public Health (SS)  4 credits 12052  
Professor Reed M, W; 8:45 - 10:00 a.m. 

HMS, REL, WGSS, JST 195-10  Judaism, Medicine and Bioethics (HU) 4 credits 13979  
Jews have been intimately involved with medicine since at least the medieval period.  This class traces that relationship from Maimonides (a 12th century Jewish scholar and physician) right up to the present day.  Who were the important figures in the history of Jews and medicine?  What is it about Jewish religion and culture that cultivates such an affinity for the healing arts?   How does Jewish law, ethics, and culture inform contemporary bioethics?  What are Jewish perspectives on abortion, assisted suicide, genetic manipulation, and other issues of our time? 
Professors Davis and Lachter M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 

HMS, AAS, GS, HIST 197-10  Keeping Africa and Africans Healthy: A History of Illness and Wellness (HU) CBE Global 4 credits 12733 
What are myths about diseases in Africa? How does the world respond to health crises, including HIV/AIDS, Ebola and others? What are African healing traditions? What is the history of global health in Africa and its implication? This course explores various health interventions and initiatives by Africans and non-Africans—missionaries, colonial officials, NGOs etc. Students final reports/papers will “perform a post-mortem” on Africa, to critically trace and analyze how efforts to control, manage and eradicate diseases have succeeded or failed. 
Professor Essien T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. 

HMS, SOC 316-10  Social Epidemiology (SS) (Writing Intensive) 4 credits 13093  
Open only to HMS majors or minors.
Professor Alang W, F; 8:45 - 10:00 a.m.

HMS, JOUR, ES, STS 323-10  Health and Environmental Controversies (SS)  
4 credits 13541  Open only to HMS majors or minors.
Professor Freidman T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 

HMS, SOC 343-10  Race, Ethnicity, and Health (SS) 4 credits 14103  
Professor Alang W, F; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 

HMS, PSYC 344-10  Health Care Reasoning and Decision Making (SS) 4 credits 14232  
Open only to HMS majors or minors.
Professor Marsh M, W; 8:45 - 10:00 a.m. 

HMS, POLS  354-10  U.S. Health Care Politics (SS) 4 credits 13543  
Professor Olson T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 

ECO 368-10  Healthcare Economics 3 credits 13978  
Professor Meyerhoefer M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 

HMS, EDUC 375-10  Community Based Participatory Research Methodology (SS)   4 credits 14008
Professor Lechuga T, R; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 

HMS, PSYC 386-10  Child and Adolescent Health Psychology (SS) 4 credits 13544  
Professor Barrett M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 

HMS 395-10  Food, Nutrition and Public Health (SS) 4 credits 14011
During this course, students will examine the intersection between the American diet and food system, the medical system and public health efforts to promote healthier lifestyles.   Focus areas will include basics about nutrition and a healthy diet, common nutrition related diseases (diabetes, cancer, heart disease, kidney disease, etc), their etiologies and pathophysiology, how our diets and our food system is contributing to chronic disease in our country, how food can BE a medicine/cure for many diseases, how public health is impacted by our food system and diets, and how medical and public health interventions should be modified to promote health and well-being.  Pre-requisite, HMS 170, 180 or HMS 160.   
Professor Coyle T, R; 7:55 - 9:10 a.m. 

Additional opportunities, permission of Program Director and/or Instructor Required.

HMS 221-10  Peer Health Adviser Training (SS) 4 credits 13131 
Professor Papaz T, R; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 

HMS 291-10 Independent Study (HU, SS) 1-4 credits  

HMS 292-10 Supervised Research  (HU, SS) 1-8 credits

HMS 293-10  Internship (HU, SS) 1-8 credits 

HMS 293-11  Health Equity Internship (HU, SS) 1-8 credits 


Fall 2017 Course Listing

University Catalog

CORE COURSES

HMS, SOC 160-10  Medicine and Society  41642  4 credits  (SS)   
Sociological perspectives on health, illness, and medical care. Focus on social epidemiology, social psychology of illness, socialization of healthprofessionals, patient-professional relationships, medical care organization and policies. Open only to SOC and HMS students. Professor Noble   T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 

HMS 180-10  Introduction to Public Health  42965  4 credits  (SS)   
This course provides historical perspective on the contributions and roles of public health; introduces health status indicators of morbidity and mortality, concepts of rate, causation, and public health surveillance and vital statistics; and addresses determinants of health from an environmental, social, behavioral perspective.  Aspects of health care delivery will be addressed from a population perspective and organizational structure.  Course can count as the core course for the minor (instead of HMS/SSP160), or taken an elective HMS students can register without permission, all others require department permission.  Professor Alang   M, W; 8:45 - 10:00 a.m. 

RESEARCH METHODS CORE COURSES

SOAN 111-10  Research Methods and Data Analysis  41794  4 credits  (SS)   
Research skills in anthropology, sociology and social psychology. Problem formulation; research design; methods and measures; analysis and interpretation of data. Emphasis on the use of statistics in the research process.  Professor Zhang   M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 

HMS, SOAN 120-10  Values and Ethics of Community-Engaged Research  44015  4 credits  (SS) CBE Diversity  
The many dimensions of community-engaged research and learning are explored, with special attention to ethical practices, values, research methods, and critical reflection.  Experiential and service aspects of the course provide opportunities for students to build skills for social and community change, as well as build capacity for research and critical inquiry.  Professor Stanlick   M; 7:10 - 10:00 p.m. 

ELECTIVE COURSES

BIOS 010-10  BioScience in the 21st Century  41573  4 credits  (NS) HMS  
A multidisciplinary survey of advances in bioscience.  Exploration of themebased topics (e.g., infectious diseases, cancer, genomebase medicine, engineered biomedical systems) coupled with social ethical considerations. Three lectures per week.  Participation in online multidisciplinary discussion, writing assignments, field trips, an/or other activities. Professor Ware   M, W, F; 10:10 - 11:00 a.m. 

HMS, EES 095-010 Human Health and the Environment  44328 3 credits (NS)
An introductory course and seminar that explores the connections between the environment and human health.  Topics include both toxic and micronutrient effects of inorganic elements, occurrence, transport in the environment, bioavailability, uptake, and impacts on human health.  Introduction to the disciplines of geochemistry, environmental epidemiology, toxicology, and exposure science. Course format will include a combination of lectures on fundamentals and seminar style topical readings.  Professor Peters  M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 

HMS, ENGL 115-10  Building the Healthy Modern Nation  41925  4 credits  (HU)   
Too often in evidence-based medical encounters, patients are regarded as merely a set of symptoms, test results, and insurance codes. Through course readings and creative writing assignments, this course will instead examine the efficacy of alternative, narrative-based approaches to illness and medicine, braiding together elements of a traditional academic classroom with a creative writing workshop, in order to explore the fundamental role storytelling plays in our understanding of and experience of illness.  Professor Kramp   T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m.

HMS, PHIL, REL 116-10  Bioethics 44309  4 credits (HU)
Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. Topics include: confidentiality, informed consent, euthanasia, medical research and experimentation, genetics, the distribution of health care, etc.  Professor Connolly  M,W,F 10:10 – 11:00 a.m.

HMS, PSYC 138-10  Abnormal Psychology  42392  4 credits  (SS)   
Examines research and theory on the patterns, causes, and treatment of various forms of abnormal behavior. Prerequisite PSYC 001 or consent of instructor.  Professor Lomauro   M, W; 7:10 - 10:25 p.m. 

HMS, REL 195-10  Public Health Ethics  44034  4 credits  (HU)   
Public health ethics seeks to understand and clarify principles and values which guide public health actions, whether those involve a disease outbreak or longterm goals for healthy living.  Because public health actions are often undertaken by governments and are directed at the population level, the principles and values which guide public health can differ from, even conflict with, those which guide actions in bioethics and medical ethics, which are more patient or individual-centered.  Professor Davis   M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 

HMS, WGSS, HIST 196-10  Does Sex Have a History? The History of Sexuality in the U.S.  43515  4 credits  (HU)   
This class explores the history of sexuality in the United States from the colonial era to the present. While sexuality can appear timeless and stable, sexual ideologies, categories, and behaviors have consistently evolved, and they have transformed American society in the process. While cod pieces and white wigs enhanced upper class men's apparent virility in the early Republic, the “Playboy era” saw a reliance of stereos and cars. Friendship between nineteenth-century women included intimacies that would now more typically be found in same-sex relationships and marriages. We will also study how institutions like the law, medicine, and the media have shaped sexual identities and experiences. In so doing, the class aims to develop sophisticated readers of historical and contemporary cultures.  Professor Najar   T, R; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 

HMS, AAS, GS, HIST 197-10  Keeping Africa and Africans Healthy: A History of Illness & Wellness. 43271  4 credits (SS) 
What are myths about diseases in Africa? How does the world respond to health crises, including HIV/AIDS, Ebola and others? What are African healing traditions? What is the history of global health in Africa and its implication? This course explores various health interventions and initiatives by Africans and non-Africans—missionaries, colonial officials, NGOs etc. Students final reports/papers will “perform a post-mortem” on Africa, to critically trace and analyze how efforts to control, manage and eradicate diseases have succeeded or failed.  Professor Essien   T, R;  9.20-10.35 a.m.

HMS 291-10  Independent Study  41771  1-4 credits  (HU, SS)   
Independent research and reading with a faculty member. After receiving initial approval from the HMS director, the student must prepare an independent study proposal, with readings and assignments, in consultation with a professor who agrees to direct the independent study. Open only to declared HMS minors who have complete HMS/SSP 160 in a previous term. Instructor permission required. Professor Marsh    

HMS 292-10  Supervised Research  43069  1-8 credits  (HU, SS)   
Research project under the direct supervision of an HMS faculty member. Consent of instructor required. Instructor permission required. Professor Marsh    

HMS 293-10  Internship  43070  1-8 credits  (HU, SS)   
Practical experience in the application of health, medicine and society for both on- and off-campus organizations. Course is designed to provide credit for supervised experiential learning experiences. May be repeated for credit up to eight credits. Prerequisite: consent of the program director. Instructor permission required. Professor Marsh    

HMS 293-11  Internship: Health Equity Internship  43251  1-8 credits  (HU, SS)   
Practical experience in the application of health, medicine and society for both on- and off-campus organizations. Course is designed to provide credit for supervised experiential learning experiences. May be repeated for credit up to eight credits. Prerequisite: consent of the program director. Instructor permission required. Professor Coyle    

HMS, PSYC 302-10  Stress and Coping  44017  4 credits  (SS)   
An examination of social life on the Internet and the World Wide Web. Topics may include sociocultural and psychological aspects of communication in cyber-environments (e.g., email, chat rooms, news groups, MUDS, etc.), interpersonal relationships and group development, the nature of community, the politics of cyberspace (control and democracy), privacy and ethics, and economic dimensions. Examination of past and current case studies. Prerequisite:  PSYC 121, PSYC 153, HMS 160 or HMS 180 Department permission required. Professor Burke   T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 

HMS, ES 306-10  Food Justice in Urban Environments  44082  4 credits  
This course will review how urban agriculture and city greening programs and policies are part of a growing movement working to strengthen neighborhoods, promote healthier living, and create more localized and sustainable food economies. This class will explore research and readings from multiple disciplines on these programs and policies, and will also delve into individual case studies that illustrate how efforts to improve food access, beautify vacant land, and reduce farm-to-table distances get creatively and successfully combined.  Professor Beck-Pooley   M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 

HMS, ENGL 315-10  What Zombies Can Teach Us About Medicine  43991  4 credits  (HU)   
Over last ten to fifteen years, popular culture has embraced the figure of the zombie with an enthusiasm that few would have predicted. While the zombie has a much longer history, since 2000 there has been a significant shift in the figure’s medicalization: zombism has become understood through rubrics such as contagion, microbiology, pharmacology, and neuroscience, among other fields. What made what was once associated with voodoo and cult horror come to be understood in biological terms? What shapes the recent cultural obsession with the meanings of this abject figure—why has the zombie gone “viral”? In this class, we will examine literature, film, and biomedical prose that deploys the zombie narrative and/or metaphor: literary fiction, such as The Zombie Autopsies and Zone One; film and television, such as iZombie and 28 Days Later; medical writing, including the Centers for Disease Control’s Preparedness 101: Zombie Pandemic, along with articles from academic journals. Assignments will include a digital project/presentation and research paper.  Professor Servitje   T, R; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 

HMS, GS, SOC 322-10  Global Health Issues  43511  4 credits  (SS)   
Examines the sociological dimensions of health, illness, and healing as they appear in different parts of the world. Focuses on patterns of disease and mortality around the world; the relative importance of ‘traditional' and ‘modern' beliefs and practices with regard to disease and treatment in different societies; the organization of national health care systems in different countries; and the role of international organizations and social movements in promoting health. Open only to HMS minors. Professor Noble   T, R; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 

HMS, PSYC 344-10  Health Care Reasoning and Decision Making  44089  4 credits  (SS)   
Health care professionals diagnose physical and mental illnesses and create treatment plans to improve their patients’ health.  How do these professionals make decisions related to these important issues?  We will explore the literature on how medical and mental health professionals reason and make decisions about health care issues. Topics to be covered include diagnosis, treatment decisions, access to care, and how these reasoning processes are swayed.  Consideration will be given to patient decision-making as well. Prerequisite:  PSYC 117 or PSYC 176 or COGS 7 or consent of instructor.  Department permission required.  Declared HMS minors can register for the HMS side of the courses on their own through the normal registration process but registering through the PSYC side requires departmental approval.  Professor Marsh   M, W; 8:45 - 10:00 a.m. 

HMS 395-10  Food, Nutrition and Public Health  44032  4 credits  (SS)   
During this course, students will examine the intersection between the American diet and food system, the medical system and public health efforts to promote healthier lifestyles.   Focus areas will include basics about nutrition and a healthy diet, common nutrition related diseases (diabetes, cancer, heart disease, kidney disease, etc), their etiologies and pathophysiology, how our diets and our food system is contributing to chronic disease in our country, how food can BE a medicine/cure for many diseases, how public health is impacted by our food system and diets, and how medical and public health interventions should be modified to promote health and well-being.  Pre-requisite, HMS 180 or HMS 160.    Professor Coyle   T, R 7:45 - 9:00 a.m. 

HMS, EDUC 396-10  Latino Health  43679  4 credits  (SS)   
The course is designed to provide a rich understanding of the factors at the individual, health care provider, institution, and policy that affect Latino health and health seeking-behaviors in the United States.  Research in the disciplines of social and behavioral sciences, epidemiology, health promotion, environmental health, minority health and health disparities, and public policy will be reviewed and discussed.  Professor Lechuga   T; 7:10 - 10:00 p.m. 


Summer 2017 Course Listing
University Catalog

HMS, PHIL, REL 116-10  Bioethics (HU)   4 credits 
Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. Topics include: confidentiality, informed consent, euthanasia, medical research and experimentation, genetics, the distribution of health care, etc.  (SS 1) T, R 7:00 - 9:50 p.m. CRN 20654 Professor Steffen  (SS 2) M, T, W, R 2:00 - 3:35 p.m. CRN 20729 Professor Schmidt

HMS, SOC 160-10  Medicine and Society (SS)   4 credits  CRN 21444
Sociological perspectives on health, illness, and medical care. Focus on social epidemiology, social psychology of illness, socialization of health professionals, patient-professional relationships, medical care organization and policies. Open only to SOC and HMS students (SS 2) online Professor Noble

**CANCELLED** HMS, SOC 162-10  AIDS and Society (SS) CBE Global  4 credits CRN 21124
Impact of the AIDS epidemic on individuals and on social institutions (medicine, religion, education, politics, etc.); social and health policy responses; international experience; effect on public attitudes and policy on people affected directly by AIDS. HMS students can register without permission, all others require department permission. (SS 1) online Professor Alang

HMS 170 Medical Humanities  (HU)  4 credits
The focus on individual voices and particular historical moments in the humanities disciplines has much to add to our understanding of health and illness.  This course will take up ethical, historical, and literary approaches to health.  The course can count as the core course for the minor, or it can be taken as one of the three electives. (SS 1) online CRN 20608 Professor Dolan (SS 1) online CRN 20608 Professor Dolan

**CANCELLED** HMS, PHIL, REL  195-10  Bioethics and the Law (HU)   4 credits  CRN 21307
Students in this course will learn something about the foundations and (nontechnical) workings of the American system of justice, and will combine that understanding with a focus on various topics in bioethics, from the “right to die” to the gene-patenting.  A key point will be the understanding that, as science and medicine continually move forward, there are always new challenges to existing legal understanding.  How should the law respond to new questions, e.g. inheritance rights of posthumously conceived children?  (SS 1) online Professor Davis

HMS, AAS, GS 197-10  Globalization and Health in Ghana (SS)   3 credits CRN 21431
This 4-week field-based course fosters global engagement by introducing students to the historical, social, cultural, and political processes that are at the forefront of globalization and health in Ghana. One objective of the program is to offer students who may not have opportunities to travel abroad (firstgeneration college students) access to, as well as support and preparation for overseas travel and education. Students will learn through cultural immersion, including tours, university campus visits, and first-hand experience and interactions with health service providers in Accra, Ghana’s capital city and nearby towns and villages. Students can from the following for their individual and group research projects choose to: 1) focus entirely on globalization, 2) focus entirely on health, or 3) explore the relationship between globalization and health, and the processes that link them. Globalization will be explored in the context of cultural dynamics and political economy. The role and impact of factors such as identity, trade, neoliberalism, arts, technology, Pentecostal Christianity, NGOs and the state, will be examined. Dimensions of health include conceptions of illness and healing, health systems and services, and social determinants of health such as gender, education, environment, religion, cultural norms, values and resources. Students interested in exploring specific global health issues such as maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, mental health, drug abuse etc. are welcome.  Professors Whitehouse, Alang and Essien.  Study Abroad

HMS, GS, SOC 322 Global Health Issues (SS)   4 credits 
Examines the sociological dimensions of health, illness, and healing as they appear in different parts of the world. Focuses on patterns of disease and mortality around the world; the relative importance of ‘traditional' and ‘modern' beliefs and practices with regard to disease and treatment in different societies; the organization of national health care systems in different countries; and the role of international organizations and social movements in promoting health. HMS students can register without permission. (SS 1) online Section 10  CRN 20655 Professor Austin (SS 2) online Section 11  CRN 21398 Professor Austin

HMS, PSYC, WGSS 334-10  The Psychology of Body Image and Eating Disorders (SS)   4 credits CRN 20604
The course addresses the psychosocial aspects of the development of healthy and unhealthy body image and eating disorders. The roles of personality traits/individual factors, family and interpersonal functioning, and cultural factors will be examined, as will the impact of representations of body image in mass media. Public health and psychological interventions for prevention and treatment will be explored. Personal accounts/memoirs, clinical case presentations, and documentary and dramatic films will be incorporated in the presentation of topics.  (Open only to declared HMS minors, declared WGSS minors, or those who have taken WGSS 001) Declared HMS minors can register for the HMS side of the courses on their own through the normal registration process but registering through the PSYC side requires departmental approval  (SS 2) M, W 7:00 - 9:50 p.m. Professor Lomauro

HMS, WGSS, SOC 341-10  Gender and Health (SS)   4 credits  CRN 21229
Relationships of sex differences and gender norms to disease and longevity. Influence of medical systems on women's lives and the impact of the women's movement on health care. Focus on specific topics, e.g. medicalization and commercialization of women's bodies, the politics of reproductive choices, and mental health. HMS students can register without permission. (SS 2) online Professor Alang

HMS, POLS  354-10  U.S. Health Care Politics (SS) WI (Writing Intensive)  4 credits CRN 20853
Explores a range of health care programs and policies and their impacts on American society. Topics include the development of the U.S. approach to health care; public sector plans (Medicare and Medicaid); the role of managed care; the employer-sponsored system; the situation of the medically uninsured; the health care vested interests and lobbyists; movements for national health care; and options for change.  Professor Olson (SS 1) T, R 9:00 - 11:50 a.m.


Course Offerings

Spring, Summer and Fall 2017

SpringSummer and Fall 2016

Spring, Summer and Fall 2015

Spring, Summer and Fall 2014

Spring, Summer and Fall 2013

Summer 2009 through Fall 2012