Course Offerings

Spring 2020 Course Listing

 

University Catalog

For class updates, restrictions, descriptions, etc., please refer here...

 
HMS 095-010 - Social Immunity TR 1335-1450, 3 credits
Swann, Jennifer & Greene, Amanda CRN: 14549 NS
Pairs basic biology with a diverse range of readings in sociology, anthropology, and cultural studies as well as literature, documentary film, and social media, to examine the role of the immune system in disease and society. Will focus especially on how biology creates structures of sociocultural understanding and control and how social factors simultaneously influence biological processes.
 
HMS 110-010 – Environmental Planning for Healthy Cities MW 0920-1035, 4 credits
Beck-Pooley, Karen CRN: 12996 SS 
An introduction to the topic of environmental planning, the course will review the roles of citizens, other stakeholders, political interests, and local governments in determining the use of land; unpack the meaning of "sustainability;" and grapple with the challenge of balancing communities' demand for development with the need to protect valuable natural resources. Students will be introduced to examples of successful and unsuccessful instances of environmental planning both at home and abroad.
 
HMS 138-010 - Abnormal Psychology MW 1915-2030, 4 credits
Lomauro, Timothy CRN: 12635 SS 
Examines research and theory on the patterns, causes, and treatment of various forms of abnormal behavior.
 
HMS 150-010 - Health Communication TR 1045-1200, 4 credits
De Maio, Mariana & Friedman, Sharon CRN: 14371 SS 
Knowledge of health communication is an essential foundation for anyone working in the field. Yet communicating about health is often complex and multi-faceted. To better understand health communication, we will explore the role of media and persuasion. We'll examine media coverage of health information; communications on risks and epidemics; theories and research of health behavior; effects of communication technologies on health communication; communicating about health data and information; health campaigns; engaging with individuals and communities with health messages and more.
 
HMS 170-010 - Medical Humanities TR 0920-1035, 4 credits
Servitje, Lorenzo CRN: 13031 HU 
The focus on individual voices and particular historical moments in the humanities disciplines has much to add to our understanding of health and illness. This course will take up ethical, historical, and literary approaches to health.
 
HMS 180-010 - Introduction To Public Health MW 0755-0910, 4 credits
Reed, Rajika CRN: 11711 SS 
This course provides historical perspective on the contributions and roles of public health; introduces health status indicators of morbidity and mortality, concepts of rate, causation, and public health surveillance and vital statistics; and addresses determinants of health from an environmental, social, behavioral perspective. Aspects of health care delivery will be addressed from a population perspective and organizational structure.
 
HMS 195-010 - Judaism, Medicine, & Bioethics MW 1045-1200, 4 credits
Davis, Dena & Lachter, Hartley CRN: 14595 HU 
This class traces the relationship between Jews and medicine from 1100 to 2020. How does Jewish religion and culture cultivate an affinity for the healing arts? How does Jewish law, ethics, and culture inform contemporary bioethics?
 
HMS 297-010 - Performance of Health M 1915-2155, 4 credits
Defenbaugh, Nicole CRN: 14933 HU 
This applied course explores the role of embodiment in healthcare while critiquing cultural and systemic practices that place bodies at risk. Students will explore the use of the body to convey meaning and deepen their understanding of physical, emotional, cultural and health issues in aesthetic texts. The course will develop interpersonal, nonverbal, and empathic skills involved in clinical care to further understand patients' and clinicians' lived experiences through their everyday performance of health. Students will examine aesthetic texts such as patient and clinician narratives that they will perform. Students will also perform a narrative they collected or from their own lived experiences. The course includes embodied activities for students to engage in artistic expressions of health, illness, and systems of care.
 
HMS 298-010 - Traditional Chinese Medicine MW 1335-1450, 4 credits
Cook, Constance CRN: 14037 HU 
In this seminar, students read and discuss in English scholarship and translations of texts critical to understanding the history of Traditional Chinese Medicine from antiquity up to the present.
 
HMS 315-010 - How Literature Made Medicine Modern TR 1335-1450, 4 credits
Servitje, Lorenzo CRN: 14814 HU 
Analyzing the stories people tell about health, illness and disability, this course engages cultural studies approaches in order to explore the way those stories are told. Topics may include: illness and the graphic novel, the changing image of the healer in literature, collaborative storytelling with Alzheimer's patients, end of life narratives, tales from the ER, narrative ethics.
 
HMS 320-010 - Food Justice in Urban Environments MW 1335-1450, 4   credits
Beck-Pooley, Karen CRN: 13838 SS 
This course will review how urban agriculture and city greening programs and policies are part of a growing movement working to strengthen neighborhoods, promote healthier living, and create more localized and sustainable food economies. This class will explore research and readings from multiple disciplines on these programs and policies, and will also delve into individual case studies that illustrate how efforts to improve food access, beautify vacant land, and reduce farm-to-table distances get creatively and successfully combined.
 
HMS 323-010 - Health & Environmental Controversies TR 1335-1450, 4 credits
Friedman, Sharon CRN: 12641 SS 
Exploration of health and environmental controversies from the perspectives of scientific uncertainty and mass media coverage. Examines genetic engineering, biotechnology, environmental health risks, and nanotechnology. Includes discussion of ethical and social responsibilities and interactions with the public.
 
HMS 354-010 - U.S. Health Care Politics TR 0920-1035, 4   credits
Olson, Laura CRN: 12642 SS 
Explores a range of health care programs and policies and their impacts on American society. Topics include the development of the U.S. approach to health care; public sector plans (Medicare and Medicaid); the role of managed care; the employer-sponsored system; the situation of the medically uninsured; the health care vested interests and lobbyists; movements for national health care; and options for change.
 
Internship, Independent Study and Research Opportunities
HMS 221-010 - Peer Health Adviser Training TR 1210-1325, 4 credits
Papaz, Jenna CRN: 12447 SS 
This applied course explores student health at Lehigh University and focuses on the development, implementation and evaluation of prevention strategies designed to make Lehigh a healthy and safe living, learning community by exploring student health-related data, examining campus-wide priority student health issues and developing evidence-based interventions. Peer Health Advisers are trained to provide peer-to-peer support, advice, resources and programming to promote healthy behaviors. Students completing the course are subsequently eligible to serve as Peer Health Advisers.
 
HMS 291 - Independent Study 1 to 4 credits SS 
Independent research and reading with a faculty member. After receiving initial approval from the HMS director, the student must prepare an independent study proposal, with readings and assignments, in consultation with a professor who agrees to direct the independent study.
 
HMS 292 - Supervised Research 1 to 8 credits HU, SS 
Research project under the direct supervision of an HMS faculty member. Consent of instructor required.
 
HMS 293 - Internship 1 to 8 credits
Marsh, Jessecae CRN: 12449 HU, SS 
Student designed internship that provides practical experience in the application of health, medicine and society for both on- and off-campus organizations. Students must find the internship on their own and submit an application to the HMS program director. Upon approval, course will provide credit for supervised experiential learning experiences. Students are responsible for obtaining any clearances required by internship host agency. May be repeated for credit up to eight credits.
 
HMS 294-010 - Health Equity Internship F 1210-1300, 1 to 8 credits
Coyle Ronco, Bonnie Reed, Rajika CRN: 13541 SS 
Students will work with a combination of staff and faculty from the Hispanic Center, St. Luke’s, and Lehigh University to assist in developing programs at the Hispanic Center LV, the emerging Center for Integrative Health, and with other community agencies to promote health equity and reduce health disparities for the South Bethlehem community. Students may participate in activities related to data collection, program management, marketing of community/public health initiatives, outreach, and grant writing. Application and clearances required.

Fall 2019 Course Listing

 

University Catalog

BIOS 010 Bioscience in the 21st Century NS (3 credits) CRN 41297
M, W, F 7:55 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
Professors Ware and Fink
 
REL, HMS, ETH 090-10 Bioethics in the News HU (4 credits) CRN 44452
M, W 1:35 - 2:50 p.m.  First-year seminar.  CAS Deans Office permission required.
Professor Davis
 
REL, HMS, ASIA, ETH 090-14 Buddhism in Mind and Body HU (4 credits) CRN 44579
T, R 3:00 - 4:15 p.m.  First-year seminar.  CAS Deans Office permission required.
Professor Pitkin
 
PHIL, REL, HMS, ETH 116-10 Bioethics HU (4 credits) CRN 43107
M, W 1:35 - 2:50 p.m.  
Professor Connolly
 
HMS, SOAN, ETH 120-10 Values and Ethics of Community-Engaged Research SS CBE Diversity (4 credits) CRN 42954
T, R 9:20 - 10:35 a.m.  
Professor Stanlick
 
PSYC, HMS 130-10 Introduction to Health Psychology SS (4 credits) CRN 44738
T, R 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.  Restricted to HMS majors and minors.
Professor Napper
 
AAS, GS, HMS, HIST 176-10 Keeping Africa and Africans Healthy:  A History of Illness and Wellness HU (4 credits) CRN 44709
T, R 1:35 - 2:50 p.m.  
Professor Essien
 
HMS 180-10 Introduction to Public Health SS (4 credits) CRN 42444
M, W 7:55 - 9:10 a.m.  Restricted to HMS majors and minors.
Professor Reed
 
CLSS, HMS 196-10 The Greek and Latin Roots of Medical Terminology HU (4 credits) CRN 44566
M, W 12:10 - 1:25 p.m.  Open to freshmen.
Professor Pavlock
 
SPAN, HMS, LAS 295-10 Spanish for the Health Professions HU (4 credits) CRN 44805
For prospective medical personnel communicating with Spanish-speaking patients. Healthcare vocabulary, patient-provider interaction, and cultural background of the Latino patient.
M, W 1:35 - 2:50 p.m.  
Professor Prieto
 
HMS 301-10 Special Topics: Food, Medicine, and Public Health SS (4 credits) CRN 44799
T, R 7:55 - 9:10 a.m.  Pre-requisites HMS 130, 160, 180 or 198.
Professor Coyle
 
HMS, ENGL 315-10 Neurodiversity in Literature HU (4 credits) CRN 42941
What can literature tell us about neurodiversity? And what can neurodiversity tell us about literature? In this course we’ll ask these key questions by reading a wide variety of texts and autobiographies by autistic people, stories with autistic characters, and classic literary works. We’ll begin by exploring the concept of neurodiversity, which insists that any notion of a “normal” or correctly functioning brain is a social construct, not a biologically superior reality. Seen from this perspective, neurodifferences are natural variations in the human genome, not impairments or deficits that should be corrected or eradicated. To understand why the neurodiversity movement arose, we’ll begin by closely analyzing relevant cultural materials such as advertising campaigns developed by the Autism Speaks organization. We’ll also explore how theories about language can be useful tools for exposing problems with behavior-based treatments for autism. We’ll then turn to fictional and nonfictional texts, exploring how acts of representation, imagination, and interpretation can enrich our understanding of neurodiversity and its ethical stakes. We’ll ask a series of questions: How do the modes of fiction, drama, and narrative work to shed light on autistic subjectivities or, in some cases, to reproduce dehumanizing stereotypes? How might neurodifferences influence the practice of reading and potentially reshape our understanding of some of the best-known literary 
works? How can we approach the literary imagination capaciously as a place that encourages different ways of being in the world?  Readings may include Seeing it Feelingly: Classic Novels, Autistic Readers, and the Schooling of a No-Good English Professor, Neurotribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity; The Reason I Jump; Loud Hands: Autistic People Speaking; Thinking in Pictures; The Heart is a Lonely Hunter; Hoccleve’s Dialogue with a Friend; Bartleby the Scrivener; and All in a Row.
M, W 12:10 - 1:25 p.m.  
Professor Crassons
 
PSYC, HMS, WGSS 334-10 The Psychology of Body Image and Eating Disorders SS (4 credits) CRN 44491
W 7:15 - 9:55 p.m.  Restricted to HMS majors and minors.
Professor Lomauro
 
PSYC, HMS 344-10 Health Care Reasoning and Decision Making SS (4 credits) CRN 44493
T, R 9:20 - 10:35 a.m.  Restricted to HMS majors and minors.
Professor Marsh
 
PSYC, HMS 397-10 Construction of Health Identity ND (4 credits) CBE Diversity CRN 44567
This course critically examines the sociocultural and medical construction of health identities and how individuals perceive, represent and challenge their identities through verbal, visual, narrative, and online texts. Topics include hidden illness, mental health, racial/ethnic identity, disability studies (crip identity), queer identity (LGBTQIA), and women’s health.
M, W 3:00 - 4:15 p.m.  Restricted to HMS majors and minors.
Professor Defenbaugh
 
HMS, WGSS 398-10 Cultural Contexts of Pregnancy and Childbirth HU (4 credits) CBE Diversity CRN 44673
In this course, we will explore primarily American conceptions of pregnancy and childbirth, beginning with a brief history of both. We will look at current laws, medical research, and grassroots activism surrounding pregnancy and childbirth and understand how intersections of race, class, and gender impact our understandings of these acts.  Texts will include film and literature.
M, W 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.  
Professor Jones
 
Internship, Independent Study and Research Opportunities
 
HMS 291-10 Independent Study HU, SS (1-4 credits) CRN 41470
Instructor permission required.
Professor HMS Faculty
 
HMS 292-10 Supervised Research HU, SS (1-8 credits) CRN 
Instructor permission required.
Professor HMS Faculty
 
HMS 293-10 Internship HU, SS (1-8 credits) CRN 42522
Instructor permission required.
Professor Marsh
 
HMS 294-10 Health Equity Internship SS (1-8 credits) CRN 44798
F 12:10 - 1:00 p.m.  Instructor permission required.
Professor Coyle and Reed

 

Summer 2019 Course Listing

University Catalog

HMS, PHIL, REL 116-11  Bioethics (HU) 
CRN 23188 / 4 credits
Prof. Schmidt (Session 2) online
Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. Topics include: confidentiality, informed consent, euthanasia, medical research and experimentation, genetics, the distribution of health care, etc.  
 
HMS, PHIL, REL 116-10  Bioethics (HU) 
CRN 23139 / 4 credits
Prof. Steffen (Session 1) T, Th; 7:00 - 9:50 p.m.
Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. Topics include: confidentiality, informed consent, euthanasia, medical research and experimentation, genetics, the distribution of health care, etc.  
 
HMS, PSYC 138-10  Abnormal Psychology (SS) 
CRN 23761 / 4 credits
Prof. Zungu (Session 1) M, T, W, Th; 12:00 - 1:35 p.m.
Examines research and theory on the patterns, causes, and treatment of various forms of abnormal behavior. Prerequisite PSYC 001 or consent of instructor.  
 
HMS, SOC 160-10  Medicine and Society (SS) 
CRN 23490 / 4 credits
Prof. Noble (Session 2) online
Sociological perspectives on health, illness, and medical care. Focus on social epidemiology, social psychology of illness, socialization of health professionals, patient-professional relationships, medical care organization and policies.  
 
HMS, SOC 162-10  AIDS and Society (SS) 
CRN 23650 / 4 credits / CBE Global
Prof. Alang (Session 1) online
Impact of the AIDS epidemic on individuals and on social institutions (medicine, religion, education, politics, etc.); social and health policy responses; international experience; effect on public attitudes and policy on people affected directly by AIDS. 
 
HMS, WGSS 196-10  From Womb to Tomb (HU)
4 credits
Prof. Kristin Temper (Session 1) online
In 1752, advice writer Richard Allestree declared that women had three roles in life: virgin, wife, and widow. Though the number of life cycles has multiplied since then, women historically have been defined and valued by their adherence to a smooth and pleasant progression through life throughout history, from sugar and spice, to young ladies, to wives, to mothers, and to wise older women trying to halt the hands of time. Such roles historically conferred status, accentuated women’s relationships with men, and reinforced cultural models of femininity.  This course explores the ideals and expectations for women’s lives—and by extension their relationships and behaviors—through the lens of women’s prescribed life cycles. As much as these questions examine how women negotiated and strived for model life stages, it is equally important to consider women who’s lives existed outside these categories either by choice or marginalization. The class will also address how minority, unfree, and poor women experienced and made meaning out of their particular phases of life. In taking up these issues, the course incorporates a wide range of disciplines and areas of study such as popular culture, the history of science and medicine, family history, and social history.  
 
HMS. AAS, GS, HIST 197-10  Keeping Africa and Africans Healthy: A History of Illness and Wellness (HU) 
CRN 23902 / 4 credits / CBE Global
Prof. Essien (Session 1) online
What are myths about diseases in Africa? How does the world respond to health crises, including HIV/AIDS, Ebola and others? What are African healing traditions? What is the history of global health in Africa and its implication? This course explores various health interventions and initiatives by Africans and non-Africans—missionaries, colonial officials, NGOs etc. Students final reports/papers will “perform a post-mortem” on Africa, to critically trace and analyze how efforts to control, manage and eradicate diseases have succeeded or failed.  
 
HMS. PSYC 302-10  Stress and Coping (SS) 
CRN 23763 / 4 credits
Prof. Burke (Session 1) online
An examination of social life on the Internet and the World Wide Web. Topics may include sociocultural and psychological aspects of communication in cyber-environments (e.g., email, chat rooms, news groups, MUDS, etc.), interpersonal relationships and group development, the nature of community, the politics of cyberspace (control and democracy), privacy and ethics, and economic dimensions. Examination of past and current case studies.  
 
HMS, AAS, GS, SOC 314-10  Infections and Inequalities: HIV, TB, & Malaria in the Global South (SS) 
CRN 23893 / 4 credits
Prof. Austin (Session 2) online
This course will explore the social, economic, and environmental causes of HIV, TB, and malaria in developing nations, with a particular focus on the characteristics and causes of these diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa. Students will engage theories and perspectives on development, globalization, and social inequality to explain trends in HIV, TB, and malaria and to understand why certain groups are more vulnerable to infection than others. The course will have a strong project or research-based component, where students will be asked to create an innovative research paper, website, interactive timeline, intervention plan, project proposal, or other deliverable.  
 
HMS, PSYC 319-10  The Psychology of Trauma (SS) 
CRN 23704 / 4 credits 
Prof. Lamauro (Session 1) M; 5:00 - 7:50 p.m. W; 7:00 - 9:50 p.m.
This course explores the nature of psychological trauma, including the physiological, emotional, cognitive, behavioral, interpersonal, and developmental impact of exposure to extreme stress and traumatic events. Historical and current perspectives on the individual and cultural effects of trauma will be examined, including consequences of relational trauma, traumatic loss, injury/illness, crime, combat exposure, terrorism, natural disasters, and vicarious traumatization. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and related conditions will be explored, as will the nature of effective intervention techniques, recovery, adaptive coping, and resilience.  
 
HMS, GS, SOC 322-10  Global Health Issues (SS) 
CRN 23140 / 4 credits
Prof. Austin (Session 1) online
Examines the sociological dimensions of health, illness, and healing as they appear in different parts of the world. Focuses on patterns of disease and mortality around the world; the relative importance of ‘traditional' and ‘modern' beliefs and practices with regard to disease and treatment in different societies; the organization of national health care systems in different countries; and the role of international organizations and social movements in promoting health.  
 
HMS, WGSS, SOC 341-10  Gender and Health (SS) 
CRN 23386 / 4 credits
Prof. Alang (Session 1) online
Relationships of sex differences and gender norms to disease and longevity. Influence of medical systems on women's lives and the impact of the women's movement on health care. Focus on specific topics, e.g. medicalization and commercialization of women's bodies, the politics of reproductive choices, and mental health.

Spring 2019 Course Listing

University Catalog

 
EES 029-010  Human Health and the Environment (NS) 
CRN 18884 / 3 credits / M, W, F 10:10 - 11:00 a.m. / Prof. Peters
An introductory course that explores the connections between the environment and human health. Topics related to human health include climate change, energy production, genome-environment interactions, zoonotic disease, and drinking water chemistry. Introduction to the disciplines of geochemistry, ecology, geospatial data analysis, environmental epidemiology, toxicology, risk assessment, and exposure science. Course format includes a combination of lectures on fundamentals and seminar style topical readings.   
 
HMS, BIOS 097-010  Neurobiology, Social Identity and Health (NS) 
CRN 18992 / 3 credits / M, W 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. / Prof. Fink
Interdisciplinary course exploring neurobiology of memory and emotion, social identity, and effects of traumatic stress on mental and physical health over the life course. Focus on interactions of social, biological and psychological factors in creating health disparities. Critical feminist analysis of the neurobiology underlying mental health and illness; exploration of how power, hierarchy, and intersectional identity impact the body. Skills gained include critical reading of scientific literature, placement of neurobiology in social and ethical context, and creation of written and illustrated materials to communicate course principles in educational, health-related and artistic settings. Students will employ comics and other arts-based modes of learning.   
 
HMS, POLS, ES 110-010  Environmental Planning for Healthy Cities (SS) 
First year students may register with instructor’s permission only.
CRN 18029 / 4 credits / T, R 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. / Prof. Beck-Pooley
An introduction to the topic of environmental planning, the course will review the roles of citizens, other stakeholders, political interests, and local governments in determining the use of land; unpack the meaning of "sustainability;" and grapple with the challenge of balancing communities' demand for development with the need to protect valuable natural resources. Students will be introduced to examples of successful and unsuccessful instances of environmental planning both at home and abroad. 

 

HMS, PHIL, REL 116 Bioethics (HU) 
Section 010 CRN 18862 / 4 credits / M, W 2:30 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Davis
Section 011 CRN 19468/ 4 credits / M, W 2:30 – 3:50 p.m. / Prof Connolly
Moral issues that arise in the context of health care and related biomedical fields in the United States today, examined in the light of the nature and foundation of moral rights and obligations. Topics include: confidentiality, informed consent, euthanasia, medical research and experimentation, genetics, the distribution of health care, etc.   
 
HMS, STS, HIST 118-010  History of Modern Medicine (HU) 
First year students may register with instructor’s permission only.
CRN 16453 / 4 credits / M, W 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. / Prof. Smith
Introduction to Western medical history from the 18th century to the present day.  Students will explore patient/practitioner relationships, examine changing ideas concerning health, sickness, and disease, chart changes in hospital care and medical education, and tackle topics such as eugenics, medical experimentation, and health insurance.   
 
HMS, WGSS, HIST 125-010  Does Sex Have a History? The History of Sexuality in the U.S. (HU) 
First year students may register with instructor’s permission only.
CRN 18842 / 4 credits / T, R 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. / Prof. Najar
This class explores the history of sexuality in the United States from the colonial era to the present. While sexuality can appear timeless and stable, sexual ideologies, categories, and behaviors have consistently evolved, and they have transformed American society in the process. While cod pieces and white wigs enhanced upper class men's apparent virility in the early Republic, the “Playboy era” saw a reliance of stereos and cars. Friendship between nineteenth-century women included intimacies that would now more typically be found in same-sex relationships and marriages. We will also study how institutions like the law, medicine, and the media have shaped sexual identities and experiences. In so doing, the class aims to develop sophisticated readers of historical and contemporary cultures.   
HMS, PSYC 138-010  Abnormal Psychology (SS) 
Prerequisite PSYC 001 or consent of instructor
CRN 17503 / 4 credits / M, W 7:00 - 8:15 p.m. / Prof. Lomauro
Examines research and theory on the patterns, causes, and treatment of various forms of abnormal behavior.
 
HMS, ANTH 155-010  Medical Anthropology (SS) 
CRN 19121 / 4 credits / T, R 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. / Prof. Whitehouse
Medical Anthropology is the study of how conceptions of health, illness, and healing methods cary over time and across cultures.  Students will learn how social and cultural factors shape health outcomes in a variety of human contexts, and will study culturally specific approaches to healing, including Western bio-medicine.  The course offers a broad understanding of the relationship between culture, health and healing.   
 
HMS, SOC 162-010  AIDS and Society (SS) 
First year students may register with instructor’s permission only.
HMS students can register without permission, all others require department permission.
CRN 19168 / 4 credits / CBE Global / W, F 8:45 - 10:00 a.m. / Prof. Alang
Impact of the AIDS epidemic on individuals and on social institutions (medicine, religion, education, politics, etc.); social and health policy responses; international experience; effect on public attitudes and policy on people affected directly by AIDS.   
 
HMS 170-010  Medical Humanities (HU) 
CRN 18070 / 4 credits / T, R 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. / Prof. Servitje
The focus on individual voices and particular historical moments in the humanities disciplines has much to add to our understanding of health and illness.  This course will take up ethical, historical, and literary approaches to health.   
 
HMS 180-010  Introduction to Public Health (SS) 
HMS students can register without permission, all others require department permission.
CRN 16383 / 4 credits / M, W 8:45 - 10:00 a.m. / Prof. Reed
This course provides historical perspective on the contributions and roles of public health; introduces health status indicators of morbidity and mortality, concepts of rate, causation, and public health surveillance and vital statistics; and addresses determinants of health from an environmental, social, behavioral perspective.  Aspects of health care delivery will be addressed from a population perspective and organizational structure.   
 
HMS, CLSS 196-010  The Greek and Latin Roots of Medical Terminology (HU) 
First year students may register with instructor’s permission only.
CRN 19069 / 4 credits / M, W 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Pavlock
This course is an introduction to scientific and medical terminology through the study of the core Greek and Latin roots and other elements (prefixes, suffixes) of this specialized vocabulary.  Students will develop the skills needed to analyze a broad range of scientific and medical terms linguistically and to recognize their components in order to understand better the meaning of medical language.  For fuller comprehension, attention will be paid to the ancient context of many of these terms.  The course will include regular homework assignments, quizzes, and exams.  No prior knowledge of Latin or ancient Greek is required.   
 
HMS, SOC 196-011  Purposeful Curiosity  (SS) 
CRN 19477 / 4 credits / T, R 2:35 – 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Stanlick
"To be curious is to be engaged." This course will explore collaborative and purposeful curiosity and the inquiry-based model of learning as it relates to sociological phenomena and social good, specifically around health and humanity. Through research approaches such as humanistic inquiry and community-engaged research, learners will explore techniques that value the expertise of diverse stakeholders, identify collaborators, design and conduct imaginative research, and understand the importance of curiosity in fueling creative work and intellectual problem solving. 1. What happens when we tug at the curious question of our ancestry and what ethical and health Social epidemiology is the study of the distribution and social determinants of health and disease in human populations. This course introduces the basic principles of epidemiological study design, analysis and interpretation, covering topics such as how a disease spreads across populations and how public health interventions can help control or reduce the spread of disease. This course also reviews epidemiology as a social science by reviewing the social causes and consequences of health.   
 
HMS, COMM 197-010  Health Communication (SS) 
Open only to HMS majors and minors
CRN 16955 / 4 credits / T, R 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. / Prof. Friedman and De Maio
Knowledge of health communication is an essential foundation for anyone working in the field.  Yet communicating about health is often a complex and multi-faceted experience.  To better understand health communication, this course will explore the role of media and persuasion.  We will examine media coverage of health information; communications on risks and epidemics; theories and research of health behavior; effects of communication technologies on health communication; communicating about health data and information; health campaigns; engaging with individuals and communities with health messages, and more. Four professors will teach this class in modules: Sharon Friedman, Haiyan Jia, Janey Lee and Mariana DeMaio.   
 
HMS 221-010  Peer Health Adviser Training (SS) 
Instructor permission required.
CRN 17248 / 4 credits / T, R 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Papaz
This applied course explores student health at Lehigh University and focuses on the development, implementation and evaluation of prevention strategies designed to make Lehigh a healthy and safe living, learning community by exploring student health-related data, examining campus-wide priority student health issues and developing evidence-based interventions.  Peer Health Advisers are trained to provide peer-to-peer support, advice, resources and programming to promote healthy behaviors. Students completing the course are subsequently eligible to serve as Peer Health Advisers.   
 
HMS, REL 226-010  From Black Death to AIDS: Plague, Pandemic, Ethics and Religion (HU) 
CRN 18897 / 4 credits / T, R 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. / Prof. Steffen
An investigation of the role of religion and ethical analysis in constructing meaning around the idea of plague and pandemic. The role of religion in the European bubonic plague epidemic, the influenza pandemic of 1918, and the AIDS crisis will be examined, with attention give to ethical analysis of the institutional response to pandemic disease as distortions have occurred for political, social, and religious reasons.   
 
HMS, MLL, CHIN, ASIA 298-010  Traditional Chinese Medicine (HU) 
CRN 19219 / 4 credits / M, W 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. / Prof. Cook
In this seminar, students read and discuss in English scholarship and translations of texts critical to understanding the history of Traditional Chinese medicine from antiquity up to the present.   
 
HMS, SOC 316-010  Social Epidemiology (SS) 
CRN 17225 / 4 credits / WI (Writing Intensive) / W, F 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. / Prof. Alang
Social epidemiology is the study of the distribution and social determinants of health and disease in human populations. This course introduces the basic principles of epidemiological study design, analysis and interpretation, covering topics such as how a disease spreads across populations and how public health interventions can help control or reduce the spread of disease. This course also reviews epidemiology as a
social science by reviewing the social causes and consequences of health.   
 
HMS, POLS, ES 320-010  Food Justice in Urban Environments (SS) 
CRN 19003 / 4 credits / T, R 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. / Prof. Beck-Pooley
This course will review how urban agriculture and city greening programs and policies are part of a growing movement working to strengthen neighborhoods, promote healthier living, and create more localized and sustainable food economies. This class will explore research and readings from multiple disciplines on these programs and policies, and will also delve into individual case studies that illustrate how efforts to improve food access, beautify vacant land, and reduce farm-to-table distances get creatively and successfully combined.   
 
HMS, JOUR, ES, STS 323-010  Health and Environmental Controversies (SS) 
Restricted to HMS majors/minors.
CRN 17511 / 4 credits / T, R 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. / Prof. Friedman
Exploration of health and environmental controversies from the perspectives of scientific uncertainty and mass media coverage. Examines genetic engineering, biotechnology, environmental health risks, and nanotechnology. Includes discussion of ethical and social responsibilities and interactions with the public   
 
HMS, PSYC, WGSS 334-010  The Psychology of Body Image and Eating Disorders (SS) 
Restricted to HMS majors/minors.
CRN 18670 / 4 credits / T 7:10 - 10:00 p.m. / Prof. Lomauro
The course addresses the psychosocial aspects of the development of healthy and unhealthy body image and eating disorders. The roles of personality traits/individual factors, family and interpersonal functioning, and cultural factors will be examined, as will the impact of representations of body image in mass media. Public health and psychological interventions for prevention and treatment will be explored. Personal accounts/memoirs, clinical case presentations, and documentary and dramatic films will be incorporated in the presentation of topics.  
 
HMS, PSYC 344-010  Health Care Reasoning and Decision Making (SS) 
Restricted to HMS majors/minors.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 117 or COGS 117 or COGS 007 or HMS 160 or HMS 180
CRN 17998 / 4 credits / M, W 8:45 - 10:00 a.m. / Prof. Marsh
Health care professionals diagnose physical and mental illnesses and create treatment plans to improve their patients’ health.  How do these professionals make decisions related to these important issues?  We will explore the literature on how medical and mental health professionals reason and make decisions about health care issues. Topics to be covered include diagnosis, treatment decisions, access to care, and how these reasoning processes are swayed.  Consideration will be given to patient decision-making as well. 
 
HMS, POLS 354-010  U.S. Health Care Politics (SS) 
CRN 17512 / 4 credits / T, R 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. / Prof. Olson
Explores a range of health care programs and policies and their impacts on American society. Topics include the development of the U.S. approach to health care; public sector plans (Medicare and Medicaid); the role of managed care; the employer-sponsored system; the situation of the medically uninsured; the health care vested interests and lobbyists; movements for national health care; and options for change. 
 
HMS, EDUC 375-010  Community Based Participatory Research Methodology (SS) 
CRN 17801 / 3-4 credits / M, W 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. / Prof. Lechuga
The course provides an introduction to the core concepts of community based participatory research (CBPR) methodology applied to social science research to address public health issues.  The course will equip students with strategies for developing community academic partnerships as well as to strengthen skills in research methods.   
 
HMS, SOC, ANTH 396-010  Narrative Medicine (SS) 
Restricted to HMS majors/minors.
CRN 19012 / 4 credits / T, R 7:55 - 9:10 a.m. / Prof. Batts
HMS 396-011  Narrative Medicine
This section restricted to Graduate Students.
CRN pending / 3 credits / T, R 7:55 - 9:10 a.m. / Prof. Batts
As public health and health care professionals, we have the privilege of hearing many patient and community stories.  Our role is primarily to bear witness to the patient experience.  Narrative medicine provides an innovative approach to making sense of patient experiences as well as the impact of patient stories on providers, observers and researchers.  Through narrative one can practice radical listening skills, advocacy skills and self care and compassion.  This course will allow students to practice the skills of narrative medicine and integrate storytelling into their practice and future studies.  Students will engage in and analyze the narratives of patients, family members, providers and community members.  Emphasis will be on active listening, writing as a healing art and analyzing the impact of social determinants of health on patient and community health outcomes.   
 
HMS 397-010  The Construction of Health Identity (ND) 
Restricted to HMS majors/minors.
CRN 18610 / 4 credits / M, W 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Defenbaugh
This course critically examines the sociocultural and medical construction of health identities and how individuals perceive, represent and challenge their identities through verbal, visual, narrative, and online texts. Topics include hidden illness, mental health, racial/ethnic identity, disability studies (crip identity), queer identity (LGBTQIA), and women’s health.